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Fall in love with the process.

~Eric Thomas

Wooh! We’ve passed the 21 day mark by finishing week 3 which is a huge step towards establishing a habit. Some people believe it takes 21 days. Others believe that it’s 30 days, 60 days, or 90 days. I’m not 100% how many days it takes to solidify a habit, but I do know that all of those are huge milestones. Here’s a recap of day 22 to 28.

Day 1 (Monday, Nov. 28, 2016): Long Run (6 miles)

If you remember from Week 3, my legs were out of commission from the football game, and I figured I’d be good to go two days later. Nope. It was awful. I was only able to run 2 miles before I switched to power hiking the treadmill on an 11 degree incline for another mile.

Day 2: 45 Minute Bike + Back & Tricep Weight Lifting

My legs were feeling a little bit better at this point, but still very sore, so I’m glad it was a pretty chill day with the stationary bike (9.3 miles). Topped it off with some quick weight lifting in the gym. Even four days later, everyone from the football game was still talking about how sore we all were!

Day 3: Intervals [5 min WU, 3x(7 min @ 10:00 + 3 min @ 9:30 + 3 min recovery jog), 5 min CD]

Hallelujah! My legs work again! Just in time too. I landed in Las Vegas for a conference, so I was VERY excited to run outside in temperatures greater than 40 degrees! This was a pretty crazy intervals run, but running on the Vegas Strip made it go smoothly and a ton of fun! Running outside is definitely way more interesting than the treadmill. I ran 5.19 miles at a 9:51 pace! I think the reason I ran harder was because I was running near so many people! Knowing that they might be watching made me push forward, just like how public accountability can push us to do what we don’t feel like doing.

[easy-tweet tweet=”Public accountability can push us to do what we don’t feel like doing.” user=”AnousoneBounket”]

Day 4: X3 Yoga

This was much needed after a solid hard run. Although it was a rest day for my legs, I probably walked at least 3 miles taking in the sights in Vegas!

Day 5: Easy Run (3 miles)

You would think that Las Vegas would still be in the 50s or 60s, but this day was in the mid 40s. I didn’t escape Wisconsin just to run in this weather! Today was the first full day of the conference which would be a full 12 hours straight, so I ran in the morning. I wouldn’t have time to supplement the runs this weekend due to the conference, but on this day, I did a different kind of plyometric workout!

I had the privilege of seeing Tony Robbins speak! It was an unreal experience! The majority of his talk was focused on having and maintaining high energy so this meant we were on our feet for about 70% of the time. He had us jumping, screaming, dancing, hugging, chest bumping, and completely just go bananas! I think I jumped and danced around more in the 3 to 4 hours with Tony Robbins than I ever did at a concert!

If you plan on attending a Tony Robbins event, bring tennis shoes.

Day 6: Easy Run (3 miles)

I’ve realized that my pacing when running outside is much faster compared to running on a treadmill. I ran a 10:15 in Day 5 and a 10:23 on this day. Although my legs were a little tired from Tony Robbins the previous night, it was still a solid run.

Day 7: Long Run (5 miles)

On my last day in Vegas, I ended the trip with a long run that ended a bit further than 5 miles because I knew that my total mileage for the week was super close to breaking the 20 mile mark! During the run, all I could think about was hitting this milestone, so I “ran through the finish line” on this last day of the week. My 4-week mileage ended at 62.08 miles! This was so crazy! That’s more than I’ve run in my entire life!

 

These first four weeks have really set the pace for my training to qualify for OCRWC. A lot of people go on challenges and don’t even make it past week 2, so to be able to make it to week 4 is a huge accomplishment that I’m super pumped about.

However, there’s one thing that a lot of people feel during a challenge to improve. It’s the desire to see significant progress! Some people start a weight loss challenge and expect to lose 20 to 30 lbs in a few weeks. Some people start a new business and expect to be rich by the first month. I’ve been running for 4 weeks now! Shouldn’t I be able to run a 4 minute mile?! Of course not.

Too often we set these crazy high expectations for ourselves, and when we don’t see the results we desire, most of us quit. Even during these runs, I sometimes wish I was at least running under a 9 minute pace. But I understand the power of the compound effect. Although I may not see any progress now, it’s all about the daily decisions and actions every single day over time that will compound into huge results in the future.

So instead of focusing on the scoreboard, we must focus on the things we can track. We must focus on the daily activity. We must focus on the small wins. We must trust the process.

They’ve always been smart. He just got lucky. She’s an overnight success. He just has high metabolism, so he can eat anything. She’s always been fit. I couldn’t do that, because I don’t have what they have.

These are all things one might hear once they’ve reached a certain level of success, whether it’s business, health, sports, etc. Instead of looking for excuses of why we can’t do something, let’s look at this with a lens of inspiration.

What we don’t often see from these successful people is the ten years they put in for their “overnight success.” We don’t see the sacrifices, the ridiculous discipline, the long nights and early mornings, the daily rejections, and the numerous failures. More importantly, we don’t realize that a lot of them started from a position similar to ours.

So here are a few reasons why it’s important for us to document the process and why I’ll be sharing my growth as an entrepreneur and journey to become an elite OCR athlete.

1. Started From the Bottom, Now We’re…Still Climbing.

One of the big reasons why we should be documenting the journey is the power in inspiring others. You can show them that they can do it too. People on the sidelines will be able to see exactly what’s needed to succeed in their journey from watching yours. They’ll be able to connect and relate to your story more so than the story of that professional athlete or multi-millionaire business guru.

They’ll be able to learn from not only your wins, but also your mistakes. They’ll be able to cheer you on, and more importantly they’ll be able to grow with you as you climb the mountain of success.

When you’re first starting out in any endeavor, people are going to question you and your choices. There’s a popular quote that highlights this perfectly.

First, people will ask you WHY you’re doing it. Later, they’ll ask you HOW you did it.

By documenting the process and your story, you’ll be able to answer both of those questions. You’ll be able to point back to everything you’ve shared so that they get the full picture of your journey.

2. Share Your Perspective, Not Your Expertise

For those of us that aren’t experts in our field or haven’t achieved those bodacious goals, we might not have expert advice or suggestions to share quite yet. People don’t like to follow or listen to others without proven results. “Fake it until you make it” doesn’t fly with people seeking real advice. If there’s one thing that people hate, it’s being deceived.

So instead of pretending to be someone you’re not, be yourself and share your point of view on certain topics. Authenticity is key in building supporters. Your unique perspective on life will be the main reason people will read or watch any content you put out. Some people will resonate with what you say, others won’t, but you don’t need everyone to agree with you.

One thing you can do as you document your journey is share what you’ve learned so far in the process. I like to implement the ILT concept: Invest, Learn, Teach. Invest in yourself. Learn from a mentor, course, seminar, etc and implement what you learn. Then teach what you’ve learned to others. Just because you’re not an expert yet, doesn’t mean you can’t give value to others.

3. Another Medium for Self-Reflection

Whether you’re doing a vlog or blog posts, this can be another form of self-reflection. Documenting the process is a great way for you to reflect on what went well, what didn’t, and what needs to be adjusted. Self-reflection is a great way to gauge whether or not you’re still on track to your goals.

[easy-tweet tweet=”What separates successful people from unsuccessful people isn’t their willpower. It’s the speed in which they get back on track once they’ve fallen off.”]

4. All Eyes Are On You

This last reason for why documenting your journey will be key to your success is public accountability! There will be those that are watching you in hopes that you succeed, because it proves to them that they can do it too. And there will be those that are watching you in hopes that you fail, because if you succeed, it proves to them that there’s no excuse for them to not go for it too. Either way, it’s up to you to determine the outcome.

There’s so much power in public accountability. Letting yourself down is one thing, but letting down the people that are cheering you on is a whole other thing.

 

I hope you consider sharing your trials and tribulations with the rest of the world during your journey, because it will benefit not only you, but others as well.